There’s a new cold war – and it’s all about data

There’s a new cold war - and it’s all about data

The cold war wasn’t ended by military might, but by Capitalism. As two worldviews competed against each other, the west’s capacity to provide TV’s, cars and political freedom triumphed. That’s one interpretation, at least.  Today there’s a new cold war underway and it’s fuelled by data. But will it be set against “a series of brief and dramatic flare-ups that recede into business as usual, or something more akin to the collapse of the Berlin Wall? Are we at a pivotal moment in history, when the regime that offers its citizens the most control over their personal data will win the day?”

Charting income mobility by sex, race and background 

Charting income mobility by sex, race and background 

A sweeping study of income inequality followed 20 million children in the United States to discover how their adult incomes varied by race and gender. With these children now in their late 30s, the results have been released. The data has been been visualised by the New York times in a series of animated charts to highlight the differences in income mobility across gender, race and financial backgrounds. The results are quite startling.

What kind of data future we might be heading towards? 

What kind of data future we might be heading towards?

“Are we heading towards a future where data is treated like oil, the preserve of monopolies who benefit from exclusive access? Or will the backlash of recent events change our course towards a ‘data wasteland’ as users respond to stories by withdrawing permissions for data about them to be used.” Data is a tool, used for good as well as for bad. But how can we benefit from the good of data while protecting us from its potentially harmful impact? Our data future is in the balance now.

 

Mapping London’s struggling property market

Mapping London’s struggling property market

The highest price paid for a property in London was £37.7m. The median price of a home in the capital is a whopping £466,450. Yet London’s property market is plummeting – or growing at a slower pace than the rest of the UK, depending on who you listen to. One thing that analysts do agree on is that prices are under pressure. This data visualisation by Bloomberg lets you compare and contrast the city’s property market by Boroughs and postcodes to compare and contrast the changes.

Our changing drinking habits

charting Our changing drinking habits

There are more breweries open today in the UK than there were in the 1930’s. Surprised? Well we’re spending more money on craft beers and gins than ever before. Despite this new found thirst for locally produced tipples, data recently released by The Campaign for Real Ale (Camra) shows that 18 pubs closed every single week in the second half of 2017. And this trend doesn’t look to be changing. This series of charts explains how our drinking habits are changing.

Heat map of dates Easter has fallen

Heat map of dates Easter has fallen

No sooner are the Christmas decorations taken down than the first signs of Easter are spotted. The odd Creme Egg here and the occasional bunny there. But is this mass consumerism at its finest or is Easter getting earlier? Stick “Is Easter…” into Google and its predictive search completes the most popular query with “getting earlier?” Easter’s ‘moveable feast’ is mapped here, from 1500 to 2018.

 

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Posted in Big data, Media roundup On March 29, 2018 By