This week we hear directly from the US government on how data is benefitting the American public; we also find out how data’s giving us an authentic taste of the local music scene. But in the meantime, let’s discover how the end of Big Data has been predicted! 

Big data is dead, long live big data

So, there you have it. “Big data” is no more. It’s all over. Gartner has killed it.

Well, not quite. The Gartner analysts have ditched their Hype Circle for Big Data, though (meaning that it also falls off Gartner’s Emerging Technologies Hype Circle too.) However, in their timely whitepaper The demise of big data, its lessons and the state of things to come, Gartner reveal that the decision was made “to move the big data discussion past hype and into practice…” Indeed Gartner’s already started 5 related Hype Circles, including Business Analytics and Intelligence.

Gartner Hype Circle

Big Data’s omission does mean that there is now a place in the Emerging Technologies Hype Circle for ‘Smart Dust’. We’ll watch with interest to see if that climbs to ‘the peak of inflated expectations’ or if it progresses directly into ‘the trough of disillusionment’!

Forecasting under a cloud

data forecasting

Big data is rapidly playing a more important role in our everyday lives. But for us long-suffering residents of the UK, the collection and analysis of big data has long played a vitally important role in our daily existence. The weather forecast. It’s the starting point of every conversation. It rules our daily routines. And now the most famous of British institutions has ditched the bastion of data forecasting and its partner of 93 years. The BBC has ended its contract with the Met Office in a review to bring its costs down.

How The Whitehouse is using your data – directly from The Whitehouse

How the US government is using data to help its citizens

Late last week, The Whitehouse published its latest report on its use of data – a ‘six month update on how the US Government has been using data – and how it benefits all americans.’

The US Chief Data Scientist took to Medium to show how his department is “responsibly unleashing the power of data for the benefit of the American public” while “maximising the nation’s return on its investment in data.” It makes for interesting reading!

The local music scene, as revealed by data

The local music scene mapped out by Spotify

When you go travelling, you want to get a real taste of the local life – from culture to cuisine. ‘When in Rome…’ and all that! So, why should our consumption of tunes be any different? Music streaming giants, Spotify has set out to let you sample the unique soundtrack of cities across the world. By analysing its huge reserves of data, Spotify has created a giant interactive map, allowing us to click hundreds of cities to hear a playlist of the music that’s most distinctively enjoyed in each. Now, we all enjoy similar current music at similar times, but these playlists share the different music that people in each city listen to, the music that people in other cities do not listen to very much. It’s this music that makes them different from people everywhere else.

Posted in Media roundup On August 24, 2015 By